2012, 2015

Typesettings — Typography

Scripts

Why should I always draw shapes that keep repeating themselves in my work? I can define them as blocks in a drawing programme, but why should I keep defining constant relationships between shapes? Therefore I need a programme that can deal with constant shapes and relationships that are partly constant and partly changing. I can enter shapes in the computer like a row of characters. This means that apart from Bodoni, Garamond and Caslon, there are also Characters. The rest can be done using the QuarkXPress programme. The technical side is, in principle, this simple. But things get complicated at the next stage when I set some aesthetic demands.

For example: a space after a character is part of the character. This means that a large character is followed by a large space. But what happens if I want all spaces to be the same? Then I create a font in which the characters are without spaces. I insert spaces between the characters myself, just as I insert spaces between words. With this, I return to the good old days of »lead«, when typesetters worked manually with the help of the n—space. Nobody knows about this anymore. As if the computer knew everything instead of man. All this is good and fair, but everything changes with the n—space. There, the journey must be taken by foot. The computer surrenders its power and turns into the ordinary (indispensable) tool that it really is.

2012

»√2&fi-MM-1-M-2«, print, 70/100 cm, 2012

»√2&fi-MM-1-MM-2«, print, 70/100 cm, 2012

»√2&fi-MM-1«, print, 70/100 cm, 2012

2015

»Gerstner-A«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-A2«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-A3«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-A4«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-A5«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-A6«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-A7«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-B«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-B2«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-B3«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-B4«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-B5«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015

»Gerstner-B6«, print, 50/70 cm, 2015